Tumbleweed Music and Camping Festival 2017

Borda Productions Presents - Tumbleweed 2017

Tumbleweed Music and Camping Festival 2017

Jamey Johnson, Cody Jinks, Whitey Morgan, Roger Creager, Billy Joe Shaver, Ward Davis, William Clark Green, Jason Eady, Paul Cauthen, Colter wall, Mickey Lamantia, Damien Gunn, Courtney Patton

Fri, July 28, 2017 - Sun, July 30, 2017

Doors: 1:30 pm / Show: 1:30 pm

LaBenite Riverfront Park

Sugar Creek, MO

$12.50 - $199.99

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Don't forget to add Camping, Lockers, Helicopter Tour, Canoe Trip, TW Merch! 

Tumbleweed Music and Camping Festival 2017
Tumbleweed Music and Camping Festival 2017
Kansas City's Country Music and Camping Festival
Jamey Johnson
Jamey Johnson
Eleven-time Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Jamey Johnson is "one of the greatest country singers of our time," according to the Washington Post. He is one of only a few people in the history of country music to win two Song of the Year Awards from both the CMA and ACMs.

His 2008 album, That Lonesome Song, was certified platinum for 1 million in sales, and his 2010 ambitious double album, The Guitar Song, received a gold certification.

In addition, he won two Song of the Year Trophies, for "Give It Away" and "In Color," both from the Academy of Country Music and the Country Music Association. He has received tremendous praise from The New York Times, Rolling Stone,
The Wall Street Journal and other publications, many of which have
hailed his albums as masterpieces.

In 2012, the Alabama native released his fifth studio album, a tribute project to late songwriter Hank Cochran. The Grammy-nominated Living for a Song: A Tribute to Hank Cochran paired him with Willie Nelson, Alison Krauss, Emmylou Harris, Ray Price, Elvis Costello, George Strait, Vince Gill and Merle Haggard.

In 2013, the Nashville Scene's 13th annual Country Music Critics' Poll named it the year's best album. (Two years earlier, the same poll named Johnson's The Guitar Song as the year's best album, and Johnson himself as best male vocalist, best songwriter and artist of the year.)
Cody Jinks
Conceived in a honky tonk long, long ago, Cody now makes his living in them. Accompanied by the Tonedeaf Hippies, he rolls across the land and the oceans onto other lands to sow a collective musical seed. Not like the brazen giant of "Texas/Red Dirt" fame, he is a fair-sized man with a Zippo whose flame longs to be ignited by the sound of real music.
"Keep that which is plastic, and the posers that compose for money. Give us your listeners, your dreamers, your huddled drunken masses longing to break free of the feces on our radios. Send these: the hippies and the cowboys, and we will flick our bics through those swinging doors."
Whitey Morgan
The history of country music has no shortage of characters hit by hard luck: the hard-working man who can't seem to make ends meet, the heart-of-gold drunk who just can't seem to put down the bottle, the woman who wants to do right but ends up, time and again, doing wrong. No matter the tragedies at the center of the songs, in most cases those characters come off like just that – characters; inventions of either a particularly gifted songwriter looking to spin a tall tale or a lazy one looking to pad out an album. But in the case of Whitey Morgan, those characters – the drinker, the troublemaker, the struggling, hard-working man – all seem arrestingly real.

That's largely because the stories on Sonic Ranch -- a big, nasty, whiskey-slugging, bare-knuckle bruiser of a country record – are pulled from Morgan's own back pages.

A native of the economically depressed city of Flint, Michigan, Morgan practically bleeds straight into each of the album's 10 songs, making for a kind of rough-and-tumble honky-tonk noir record that can pack the dance floor while doing Bukowski proud. Morgan opens the record at a loss – "I gave up on Jesus/ When momma gave up on me/ So much for the family life/ It's just me and the whiskey," he growls in the album's opening moments – and spends the rest of it fighting to keep the rest from being wrenched away, bottle by his side, fists clenched. "If I'm going down tonight," he defiantly sings, "I'm going down drinkin'."

Credit most of the album's fighting spirit to Morgan's childhood in Flint. A teenager who, in his own words, "got my ass kicked on a daily basis," Morgan witnessed the toll the city's troubled economy took on the people closest to him. "I experienced Flint through my parents and relatives," he explains. "A lot of them lost jobs at General Motors, and I saw a lot of factories close and get torn down." Despite the turmoil, Morgan's family was close. "We never dwelled on the negative. My mom always had dinner on the table and my dad worked everyday for GM to make sure there was always food. They never let on that things were getting bad, ever. Growing up in Flint ignited the 'never give up' attitude I apply to every part of my life. That's what you learn when you grow up in that town. You also learn that you don't take shit from anyone, ever."

Morgan's certainly not taking any shit on 'Sonic Ranch.' On the grizzled, smoky cover of Waylon Jennings' "Goin' Down Rocking," he digs his heels in against anyone who would dare try to steamroll him. On "Low Down on the Backstreets," over staggering piano and glistening apostrophes of pedal steel, he's pushing back against a broken heart with country songs and dancing girls. And on the harrowing cover of Townes Van Zandt's "Waitin' 'Round to Die," he's staring down mortality with his jaw set and his eyes narrowed. "I have loved that song since the first time I heard it," Morgan says. "It's a dark masterpiece that looks in on a not-so-perfect, but not uncommon, life story. I did my best to put my own heart, soul and experiences into my version. I had a vision of making it sound as if it could be the score for the next Sergio Leone classic." Morgan achieved his vision; with its ominous, shadowy guitars and spectral lap steel, the song serves as the album's grim, potent centerpiece.

Even in its lighter moments – the holler-along revelry of "Ain't Gonna Take It Anymore"; the tender 'Good Timin' Man," which tackles the pressures of love and persona – Sonic Ranch embraces the grit while maintaining a determinedly unvarnished sound. Much of that has to do with the relaxed atmosphere in the studio that gives the record its name. "My manager told me about this place he had been to outside of El Paso called Sonic Ranch," Morgan says. "That was a real departure from the usual studio vibe. My manager knows how much I do not like the 'studio' thing -- I never feel comfortable. This was exactly what I needed: a laid-back place with great gear where we could make a great record."

More than just the physical environment, though, Morgan also needed a producer he could trust. "We needed someone that could get the big bad sound we wanted, that wouldn't slick it up Nashville style. We also needed someone that would push me to my limits and not let me settle. We found that guy when we found Ryan Hewitt." Together Hewitt, Morgan and his band crafted a record as big on heart as it is on attitude. It's a record about loss and pain, but also about picking yourself up and pressing on, fighting to get what you want, and then to hold on to it for dear life.

"The goal for me on this album was to keep moving forward musically, and try to give the fans my best album yet," Morgan says. "I don't really look at the big picture, I just always try and outdo myself." On Sonic Ranch, he's done exactly that.
Roger Creager
Roger Creager
For more than a decade, Roger Creager built a reputation on his distinctive brand of hard-core, rabble-rousing Texas Country music, on his rich, full-bodied voice that can carry a tune for miles, and on his exceptional ability to work thousands of Texans into a rabid frenzy with his voice and guitar, in the great concert tradition of Jerry Jeff Walker and Robert Earl Keen. Along the way, he's been writing some mighty fine instant classics about family heirlooms, fields of bluebonnets, and late night trips to Mexico. Four albums, hundreds of thousands of road miles, and an ever-expanding fan base later, Here It Is has Roger Creager laying his cards on the table with thirteen songs that are arguably his best batch yet.

"It's been five years since I've put out anything new," Roger says. "So it's five years of evolving and maybe even maturing, although it's still me." Actually, it's more of him than ever. For the first time, he's written or co-written every song on the album.

The first single, "I'm From the Beer Joint" plays to Creager's honky-tonk wildcat image informed by his live album, as he declares his preference for independent drinking establishments. "It's not going to change any lives, but it sure is fun," Creager laughs about the sing-along, before turning serious. "But who wants to listen to a whole album of that?" He's aiming for something higher.

"I hope there's a song here that penetrates your soul, too," he says, leaning forward. "There's a few that may do just that. I aimed with a shotgun. I really did try to mix it up. There's love songs [Missing You], drinking songs [the aforementioned "Beer Joint"], up-tempo dancing songs [I Love Being Lonesome], groovy little tunes [Tangle Me in You], one about a man who's screwed up and he's driving like hell through the middle of the night to get home [Driving Home]. 'I Loved You When' is my best story song yet. It doesn't even tell the whole story. It doesn't have to. It gives you just enough to know there's a history there. It's all you need to know."

The two catalysts behind the album were Lloyd Maines, the go-to producer who produced Creager's first albums, and Radney Foster, the Texas kid from Del Rio, whose songs and productions have established him as one of country music's most innovative and edgy operators. Radney teamed up with Justin Tocket, a talented producer himself, to co-produce this project. But Roger himself is the biggest catalyst of all.

The Corpus Christi native was raised on songs like Guy Clark's "Desperadoes Waiting For A Train" and Gary P. Nunn's "You Ask Me What I Like About Texas" and under the influence of Jerry Jeff Walker, Lyle Lovett, Robert Earl Keen, and Jimmy Buffett, along with Willie, Waylon, Cash, Merle, and even Sinatra.

He graduated from college and spent two years in Houston working a 8-5 gig. He finally listened to his heart and moved back to College Station to pursue a life in music. Working without a paycheck was liberating. "I'd always been a slacker," Roger admits, "and I could easily see myself failing in music because I wasn't trying hard enough. So I promised myself that would be one excuse I'd never use. I just got out there and busted my hump."

In 1998, he released Having Fun, then blew open the doors two years later with I Got the Guns. The title track, a striking piece about his granddad and his family, became a staple on more than 200 radio stations programming Texas Country Music. Long Way To Mexico and Live Across Texas grew his audience beyond state lines.

Here It Is speaks to those broadening horizons. "I was in 14 countries last year," Roger says. "I want to take our music to a wider audience without compromising the integrity of the music. I'm taking some of who I am to where I'm going."

"I've always tried to make records where every song is different so I can listen to them over and over again instead of forty five minutes of essentially the same song," he says. With Here It Is, he can do just that. This go-round, he's staying on for the whole ride.
Billy Joe Shaver
Billy Joe Shaver
Join us for an evening with the original Honky Tonk Hero, Billy Joe Shaver. Billy Joe Shaver became a standard in the honky tonk, country outlaw genre in the 1970s with the album 'Old Five And Dimers Like Me' and has remained a favorite of musicians and critics ever since. Johnny Cash and Willie Nelson have both sang Billy Joe's praises as a songwriter and The Wall Street Journal praised Billy Joe's ability to "at 74...still get a crowd rowdy." You want to be part of that crowd!

Creatively complimenting Billy Joe's brand of country is Jeremiah Tall, the one man show out of Bucks County. Jeremiah has a crowd pleasing spin on folk rock that includes a hand painted suitcase converted into his kick drum.
Ward Davis
Ward Davis is an American Singer/Songwriter from Southeast Arkansas. Since moving to Nashville in 2000, Ward has written songs recorded by Trace Adkins, Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, Wade Hayes, Sammy Kershaw and many others. While writing has always been a passion for Ward, his first true love is singing and playing. In early 2015, he teamed up with Grammy Winning producer Jim "Moose" Brown to record his first full-length album of original material. The album, "15 Years in a 10 Year Town," will include eight self-penned songs along with the Ed Bruce classic, "Old Wore Out Cowboys," a collaboration with Willie Nelson and Jamey Johnson. That album is scheduled to be released in the Summer of 2015.

On top of having his own solo career, in 2009, Ward, along with friends Rick Huckaby & Matt Nolen, formed the alt-country band, The Beagles in Nashville. Since then they have written and recorded two studio albums – "Meet the Beagles" in 2010 & "Mucho Dos Grande," in 2012. They were featured on the A&E original series "Crazy Hearts Nashville" in 2014 and performed background vocals on the song they wrote for Trace Adkins, "So What If I Do." The Beagles will also be performing the theme song of the soon to be released comedy/drama, "Still The King," starring Billy Ray Cyrus on CMT.
William Clark Green
William Clark Green: Rose Queen

With two critically esteemed album releases already under his belt, William Clark Green is back and this time it is getting personal. Give Green a pen and paper and he is a lyrical force to be reckoned with. On his highly anticipated third release, Rose Queen, he is putting it all on the line and making absolutely no apologies. "Songwriting is reality. People are scared to put reality on paper, but this is 10 times more reality than my past work," Green explains bluntly. The past few years have been consumed with Green touring heavily in the booming Texas scene and persistently writing a plethora of songs that are pulled from true-to-life experiences. Green has adamantly pushed his boundaries as a writer saying, "Songwriting is exactly what is in your heart, in my opinion, it is not about writing a hit. It is about revealing your heart and your feelings on the paper."

The music on Rose Queen ranges from the familiar Cajun flare he is known for on "Let's Go" to the highly reflective and introspective "Welcome to the Family." In the candidly honest lead single, "It's About Time," Green tackles the harsh reality that a significant relationship must end. He explains, "I think the new record will connect with a certain demographic of people who have been effected by something, some event, some moment in their lives and therefore can identify with my stories."

Not only has Green raised the bar with his seasoned writing and musicianship, he also enlisted a team of powerhouses to mold his full package of artistry. Music Industry veteran Rachel Loy was recruited to undertake producing the new record. Green declares, "I was sold on her in just 30 minutes. She installs confidence and challenges me to be better." Loy shares the same respect for Green saying, "Everything about the William Clark Green band is original, real and raw. This record, from the songs to the solos to the drum sounds, was a result of every band member following their instincts until they landed on the perfect part. It's been a privilege to watch such major raw talent sharpen into a clear vision."

Additionally, in the last year he signed with new management, 415 Entertainment, as well as landed a booking deal with Nashville's Paradigm Agency. For the first time, Green embraced the nature of co-writing and included 4 tracks of co-writes on the new album pairing up with noted writers like Kent Finlay on the defiant "Hanging Around," and Brian Keane on the fun sing-along "She Likes The Beatles."

William Clark Green is definitely no stranger to the music scene; he knew at the ripe age of 13 that he would embrace his passion and work vigorously in order to make a name for himself. As a seventh grader with substantial ambition, he began receiving guitar lessons and spending free time with his cousin writing music and bouncing ideas off of one another. Green draws inspiration from his personal musical hero Willis Allan Ramsey, as well as his father who Green has fond memories of with a guitar in hand.

While attending college at Texas Tech University, Green played for a live audience whenever he could and steadily gained notoriety on the Texas music scene. He credits the Blue Light in Lubbock as his unofficial home, where he spent many nights honing on his craft and gaining a loyal army of followers.

His first album Dangerous Man caught the attention of radio stations in West Texas, but his sophomore album Misunderstood, which spawned the top 20 Texas Music Chart hit "Tonight," put him on the map as an artist to watch.
Jason Eady
Jason Eady's inspired new album Daylight & Dark embraces multiple styles of die-hard country music to weave together 11 songs about the deep, messy details of love and life.

The disc is sequenced to follow the arc of one man's journey through the complexities of the heart. But the semi-autobiographical Daylight & Dark is not a concept album. Instead, it's a powerful study in honesty; a collection of real stories populated by real characters that coalesced around Eady's title track.

"The moment I came up with the first verse and chorus of 'Daylight & Dark' was a breakthrough," Eady relates. "I understood that what I wanted to convey in the album is that life is not simple. Most songs don't do that. They're either happy or sad. But life doesn't work that way. Most of the time we live somewhere in between. And that place is between the daylight and the dark."

It took roughly three months for Eady to write and begin recording these songs that he describes as "going beyond the surface and digging into the little cracks in our lives, our dreams and our desires — the things that keep us from connecting, that we all have to deal with, all the time."

Eady's sixth release is the follow-up to 2012's AM Country Heaven, an artistic and commercial breakthrough that cracked the Top 40 on Billboard's Country Albums chart, boasting an old-school honky-tonk sound and a complete lack of artifice.

"One of the things that Kevin Welch" — who produced both discs — "taught me is that believability is number one," Eady declares. "The things I'm writing about have to seem true and the words being said need to sound like they'd really come out of my mouth."

Daylight & Dark's high-powered barroom ballads 'OK Whiskey' and 'We Might Just Miss Each Other' offer a direct connection to the honky-tonk spirit of AM Country Heaven. But tunes like 'Other Side of Abilene' have gentler, textured arrangements, crafted by carefully layered fiddle and electric, acoustic and pedal steel guitars that are more reflective of the album's overall sound. Also, 'Late Night Diner' and the title cut echo the narrative style of great singers like Vern Gosdin and Don Williams, whose recordings, like Eady's, blend a novelist's eye for detail with the welcoming voice of a natural storyteller.

"Their approach and the roadhouse style of artists like Merle Haggard and Buck Owens are both part of my DNA," Eady relates. "I hope that really comes across on Daylight & Dark and makes it a deeper country music album overall."

The new disc is Eady's third collaboration with Welch. Their first was 2009's When the Money's All Gone.

"Kevin is more on the same page with me than anybody else," Eady says of his songwriting, performing and Americana Music Association award-winning Texas compatriot. "He is fantastic at getting the songs into the best shape before we record them and choosing the right band for the studio, so that by the time we start recording 90-percent of the important work is done."

When Eady and Welch were making AM Country Heaven, it was initially intended as a side project that wouldn't be released under Eady's name. But the sterling results dictated otherwise, and made the album a game-changer. The disc's swaggering palette and adult approach to timeless topics like love, loss and yearning helped Eady find a new, larger audience whose members now welcome him wherever he travels.

Daylight & Dark was cut just outside of Nashville at engineer George Bradfute's Tone Chaparral studio with a superb team of players. They included Americana award winning multi-instrumentalist Fats Kaplin on pedal steel and fiddle, guitarist Richard Bennett (who's worked with a diverse array of artists from Rodney Crowell and Emmylou Harris to Barbara Streisand and Neil Diamond), drummer John Gardner (Jim Lauderdale, Don Williams, Dixie Chicks) and bassist Steve Mackey (Dolly Parton, Delbert McClinton).

Although country music was Eady's first love, he was exposed to the musical stew of the lower Delta — blues, soul, R&B and primal swamp rock — while growing up in Jackson, Mississippi. Eady was performing in local bars by the time he was 14, singing and playing guitar. He began writing his own songs, but the live music culture in the Magnolia State was geared to hits and classics rather than original music.

Eady moved to Nashville to seek a record deal, but he became disillusioned and headed back to Mississippi, joining the Air Force on the way home. "Becoming a translator in the Air Force helped me be a better songwriter," Eady says. "I got a much broader view of the world and of other cultures, which helped me see things from a better perspective." After the military Eady got a job in a Fort Worth bank's IT department, and he began attending open mic nights to blow off steam. Soon he developed a following.

"I was surprised to learn that Texas was exactly the opposite of Mississippi," he says. "If you played too many cover songs the audience would get restless. They wanted original music." That encouraged Eady to step up his songwriting and step away from his day job, never to return.

Eady says his first two albums, 2005's From Underneath the Old and 2007's Wild Eyed Serenade, "were about trying to zero in on what I wanted to do. They had singer-songwriter, country, southern rock and other kinds of songs. I had no idea about production or how to work in the studio. I was all over the map. Things really clicked when I started working with Kevin. He helped me focus on the music I heard growing up in Mississippi, but as a way of discovering more about who I was as an artist.

"With AM County Heaven and now Daylight & Dark, I've learned to stop second guessing," Eady declares. "Now I understand that I'm a country artist. That's the music I love, and that's what I always want to be."
Biopic
Paul Cauthen
Paul Cauthen remembers sitting alone in an Austin house after a weekend-long bender. A life making music seemed to be slipping away. Wide awake with nothing to lose, he fell on his hands and knees right there, bowed his head, and threw down a divine gauntlet.

"I dared Him," Cauthen says, recalling his desperate challenge to God. "I said, 'Use me. I'll be a rag doll. Just put me out there, let's go. I dare you.'"

Most people don't plead in the form of a dare. That blend of vulnerability and brash confidence is part of what makes Cauthen and his music––which often hinges on the same paradox––so compelling. Whether it was by heavenly intervention or sheer force of will, Cauthen emerged with My Gospel (Lightning Rod Records), his mesmerizing full-length solo debut. Produced by Beau Bedford, the record is both an artistic and personal triumph. My Gospel captures a young artist in full possession of a raw virtuosity that must sometimes feel like a burden: If your singing takes listeners on white-knuckle rides and you write like a hard-luck Transcendentalist poet who abandoned the East Coast for the desert, you'd better do both. Anything else just wouldn't feel like living. "I don't know what else I'm supposed to do in life," Cauthen says. "So I just kept on working. Even when I didn't hardly have money to eat, my songs allowed me to get into the studios. I wrote my way into this thing."

The album is called My Gospel, but make no mistake: These are songs about Earthly struggles to love, connect, and just get by. "I'm not super religious," Cauthen says. "I don't believe God is this guy wearing a white cloak who comes down with wings and beautiful sandals. I do believe that people are put into other people's lives for reasons, and those reasons are unexplained. I believe that is God."
Colter wall
Colter Wall is a young Saskatchewan born songwriter and performing musician. Steeped in Old Timey material and traditional Americana, Wall's sound is comprised of resonate and raw baritone vocals, Folk and Bluegrass style guitar and banjo picking, steady kick-drum stomping, and visually provoking, story telling lyrics. Wall Draws influence from legends of the past such as Hank Williams, Robert Johnson, Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Townes Van Zandt, and The Band, as well as more modern Americana pioneers including Shovels and Rope, Jack White, Ray Lamontagne, and Shakey Graves. Despite only recently beginning his musical career, Colter Wall has been seen in the company of Saskatchewan's infamous gritty bluegrass trailblazers,The Dead South. Wall has had the opportunity to open for The Dead South on several occasions with more show's upcoming. In addition to racking up memorable live shows across the province, Wall is planning on releasing an EP in the summer of 2015 and has been busy recording at Regina's own Studio One. From dive bars to fundraiser galas, Colter Wall has a history of leaving audiences in shock at the maturity of his voice as well as his songwriting.
Courtney Patton
Courtney Patton has spent the last few years building her lifelong passion into a real career. Touring steadily, writing constantly, and singing her heart out onstage and on record, she's become a welcome discovery for listeners who've found their way to her sweet and soulful take on classic country music. Her first full-length record, Triggering A Flood, was released in May 2013 to regional acclaim and her 2015 follow-up So This Is Life is poised to make an even larger splash as her audience has expanded to corners all around the world. Her expansive voice, laced with deep Texas twang but bearing the influence of favorite songwriters from the '70s folk-rock scene all the way through the present day, gives new life to old themes of finding love and freedom where you can and trying to hold yourself together when it slips away. Since the release of Triggering A Flood, her music has taken her on tours through Europe and Canada as well as across the United States; she's also toured and recorded with Jason Eady, a fellow keeper of the real-country-music flame that Patton wed in 2014. She's also shared the stage with leading lights of the country-folk genre including Walt Wilkins, Bruce Robison, Jamie Lin Wilson, and Drew Kennedy, the latter of whom served as producer on So This Is Life. Indebted to the subtle depths of her favorite late-'70s Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard records, it's a perfect frame for Patton's lyrical snapshots of heartache, longing, and love
Venue Information:
LaBenite Riverfront Park
Hwy 291 & LaBenite Trail
Sugar Creek, MO, 64058